Catholic T-Shirts By Lionheart Apparel

Checkout these Catholic T-shirts (Amazon Affiliate links).



Orange Shirt with Navy Blue Symbol Symbol: Triquetra Symbol History: The term ‘triquetra’ is taken from the Latin root ‘triquetrus’, meaning “three-cornered.” The symbol is comprised of the center connection points of three interwoven circles, distinct yet equal and inseparable, symbolizing the triune God -the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit – in the trinity. Scripture Passage: The phrase “Be Perfect” is taken from Matthew 5:48: “Be you therefore perfect, as also your heavenly Father is perfect.”


Navy Blue Shirt with Orange Symbol Symbol: Triquetra Symbol History: The term ‘triquetra’ is taken from the Latin root ‘triquetrus’, meaning “three-cornered.” The symbol is comprised of the center connection points of three interwoven circles, distinct yet equal and inseparable, symbolizing the triune God -the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit – in the trinity. Scripture Passage: The phrase “Be Perfect” is taken from Matthew 5:48: “Be you therefore perfect, as also your heavenly Father is perfect.”


Red Shirt with Green Symbol Symbol: Maronite Cross Symbol History: The three horizontal bars of the Maronite Cross represent the unity of the triune God – the three persons of the trinity. The Lebanese flag is red, green, and white, with the prominent characteristic being the cedar tree in the center of the flag. The red stripes symbolize martyrdom and self-sacrifice, and the white represents the snow-capped peaks of Lebanon’s mountains. The cedar has been used as a symbol by the Maronite Christians of Lebanon since the 18th and 19th centuries. The comparison between the Maronite Cross and the cedar tree is unmistakable. The tree represents peace, immortality and tolerance. Scripture Passage: The phrase “The Glory” is short for “The glory of Lebanon”, which is mentioned twice in Isaiah, 35:2 and 60:13: “The glory of Libanus shall come to thee, the Ar tree, and the box tree, and the pine tree together, to beautify the place of my sanctuary: and I will glorify the place of my feet.” Is. 60:13 (Amidst the present-day destruction of Lebanon, we pray that our country will one day rediscover its glory through lasting peace).


PLEASE NOTE: Image shows Green tee, but item sold is royal blue. ** Royal Blue Shirt with Green Symbol Symbol: IHS, the monogram for Jesus Christ Symbol History: The ‘IHS’ symbol is taken from the first three letters of Jesus’s name in Greek: IHSOUS. The monogram is often mistakingly interpreted as an acronym for “Jesous Hominum Salvatore”, or Jesus, the Savior of men. Though the symbol dates back to the third century, it’s popularity as a symbol for Jesus spread because of St. Vincent Ferrer and St. Bernadine of Siena in the fifteenth century. Later, St. Ignatius of Loyola used the symbol in the seal for the Society of Jesus. Artistic renditions abound for this monogram. The usage of a cross in the place of the “I” became common in eighteenth and nineteenth century gravestones. Scripture Passage: The phrase “The Light Shineth in Darkness” is taken from the Gospel of John (1:1-5): “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by Him: and without Him was made nothing that was made. In Him was life, and the life was the light of men. And the light shineth in darkness, and the darkness did not comprehend it.” Jesus is “The way, the truth, and the light.” John 14:6.


Symbol Name: IHS, Monogram of Jesus Christ Represents: Jesus Symbol History: The ‘IHS’ symbol is taken from the first three letters of Jesus’s name is Greek: IHSOUS. The monogram is often mistakingly interpreted as an acronym for “Jesous Hominum Salvatore”, or Jesus, the Savior of men. Though the symbol dates back to the third century, it’s popularity as a symbol for Jesus spread because of St. Vincent Ferrer and St. Bernadine of Siena in the fifteenth century. Later, St. Ignatius of Loyola used the symbol in the seal for the Society of Jesus. Artistic renditions abound for this monogram. The usage of a cross in the place of the “I” became common in eighteenth and nineteenth century gravestones.

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