Readings 20150221

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2015, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net

When your neighbor stumbles through sin or ignorance, do you point the finger to criticize or do you lend a helping hand to lift him or her up? The prophet Isaiah tells us that God repays each in kind. When we bless others, especially those who need spiritual as well as physical and material help, God in turn blesses us. When Jesus called a despised tax collector to be his disciple he surprised everyone including Levi (also known as Matthew). The religious leaders were especially upset with Jesus’ behavior towards public sinners like Levi. People in Palestine were divided into roughly two groups: the orthodox Jews who rigidly kept the law and all its petty regulations, and the rest who didn’t keep all the minute regulations. The orthodox treated the latter like second class citizens. They scrupulously avoided their company, refused to do business with them, refused to give or receive anything from them, refused to intermarry, and avoided any form of entertainment with them, including table fellowship. Jesus’ association with the latter, especially with tax collectors and public sinners, shocked the sensibilities of these orthodox Jews.
When the Pharisees challenged Jesus unorthodox behavior in eating with public sinners, Jesus’ defence was quite simple. A doctor doesn’t need to treat healthy people – instead he goes to those who are sick. Jesus likewise sought out those in the greatest need. A true physician seeks healing of the whole person – body, mind, and spirit. Jesus came as the divine physician and good shepherd to care for his people and to restore them to wholeness of life. The orthodox were so preoccupied with their own practice of religion that they neglected to help the very people who needed the greatest care. Their religion was selfish because they didn’t want to have anything to do with people not like themselves. Jesus stated his mission in unequivocal terms: I came not to call the righteous, but to call sinners. Ironically the orthodox were as needy as those they despised. All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God (Romans 3:23). Do you thank the Lord for the great mercy he has shown to you? And do you seek the good of all your neighbors and show them mercy and kindness?

What does it mean to “leave all and follow the Lord”? Bede the Venerable (673-735 AD), an Anglo-Saxon monk who wrote numerous commentaries on the Scriptures, explains what it meant for Matthew and for us to “follow” as disciples of the Lord Jesus:

“By ‘follow’ he meant not so much the movement of feet as of the heart, the carrying out of a way of life. For one who says that he lives in Christ ought himself to walk just as he walked, not to aim at earthly things, not to pursue perishable gains, but to flee base praise, to embrace willingly the contempt of all that is worldly for the sake of heavenly glory, to do good to all, to inflict injuries upon no one in bitterness, to suffer patiently those injuries that come to oneself, to ask God’s forgiveness for those who oppress, never to seek one’s own glory but always God’s, and to uphold whatever helps one love heavenly things. This is what is meant by following Christ. In this way, disregarding earthly gains, Matthew attached himself to the band of followers of One who had no riches. For the Lord himself, who outwardly called Matthew by a word, inwardly bestowed upon him the gift of an invisible impulse so that he was able to follow.”
Are you ready to forsake all for the Lord Jesus Christ?
“Lord Jesus, our Savior, let us now come to you: Our hearts are cold; Lord, warm them with your selfless love. Our hearts are sinful; cleanse them with your precious blood. Our hearts are weak; strengthen them with your joyous Spirit. Our hearts are empty; fill them with your divine presence. Lord Jesus, our hearts are yours; possess them always and only for yourself.” (Prayer of Augustine, 354-430)

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2015. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com
WALKING INTO GLORY

“Then you shall delight in the Lord, and I will make you ride on the heights of the earth.” —Isaiah 58:14
We are on the fourth day of a forty-day journey through the desert of Lent. Our destination is the celebration of Jesus’ resurrection from the dead. When we meet the risen Christ in a new way this Easter time, “light shall rise” for us “in the darkness, and the gloom shall become” like midday (Is 58:10). “Then the Lord will guide” us always and give us “plenty even on the parched land” (Is 58:11). “The ancient ruins shall be rebuilt” for our sakes and “the foundations from ages past” we shall raise up (Is 58:12). ” ‘Repairer of the breach,’ they shall call” us, ” ‘Restorer of ruined homesteads’ ” (Is 58:12).

Yes, this Easter season will be more than we could ever ask for or imagine (Eph 3:20). Isaiah’s prophecies from over 2,500 years ago will be fulfilled again. The risen Christ’s love and glory will be so greatly manifested this Easter that it would be too much for us if we had not prepared our hearts through our Lenten repentance, fasting, penance, and prayer. Because Easter is so great, Lent is so necessary. Enter fully into Lent.

Prayer: Father, make me ready for anything as I grow in holiness this Lent more than ever before. Promise: Jesus “said to him, ‘Follow Me.’ Leaving everything behind, Levi stood up and became His follower.” —Lk 5:27-28 Praise: St. Peter Damian’s faith enabled him to fight against scandals in the priesthood that were occurring over a thousand years ago. (To help you observe Lent more deeply, order our book, Scriptural Stations of the Cross, and our leaflets A Prophetic Lent, Lent and the Renewal of Our Baptismal Promises, The Secret of Fasting, and The Secret of Confession.)
Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from February 1, 2015 through March 31, 2015.
†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, August 25, 2014.
The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements

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