Readings 20150203

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2015. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com

THE TOUCH

” ‘If I just touch His clothing,’ she thought, ‘I shall get well.’ ” —Mark 5:28
A woman who was hemorrhaging touched Jesus. According to Jewish law, this made Jesus unclean (cf Lv 15:25, 27). Instead, His touch made the woman healed and whole (Mk 5:29ff). Touching Jesus is unlike touching anyone else in the world.

Jesus reached out to touch and take the hand of a dead, twelve-year-old girl (Mk 5:41). According to Jewish law, this made Jesus unclean (see Nm 19:11). Instead, Jesus’ touch raised the girl from the dead (Mk 5:42). No one else’s touch can raise the dead.

Do you want to touch Jesus and be touched by Him? You can be touched by Jesus through the members of His body, the Church. You can touch Jesus in the Sacraments, especially in the Eucharist, the Body and Blood of Christ. Get in touch with Jesus by loving His Church (Eph 5:25) and receiving Him in Holy Communion. In touch with Him, you are in touch with life, love, hope, peace, freedom, joy, purity, and victory. In touch with Jesus, you are in touch with healing and resurrection. You are in touch with God.

Prayer: Jesus, touch me, and “O, what joy shall fill my soul.” Promise: “Let us keep our eyes fixed on Jesus, Who inspires and perfects our faith.” —Heb 12:2 Praise: St. Blase, who is invoked for healing of throats, allowed his own throat to be severed as he was beheaded for his faith in Jesus. (For related teaching, order our booklet, Healing: The Imitation of Christ.)
Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from February 1, 2015 through March 31, 2015.
†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, August 25, 2014.
The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2015, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net
Do you approach the Lord Jesus with expectant faith or with skeptical doubt? People in desperate or helpless circumstances were not disappointed when they sought Jesus out. What drew them to Jesus? Was it hope for a miracle or a word of comfort in their affliction? What did the elderly woman who had suffered miserably for twelve years expect Jesus to do for her? And what did a grieving father expect Jesus to do for his beloved daughter who was at the point of death? Jesus gave hope where there seemed to be no human cause for it because his hope was directed to God. He spoke words of hope to the woman (Take heart, daughter!) to ignite the spark of faith in her (your faith has made you well!).
Ephrem the Syrian (306-373 AD), an early church Scripture scholar and author of hymns and commentaries, reflected on the miracle of the woman who was healed of her flow of blood:

“Glory to you, hidden Son of God, because your healing power is proclaimed through the hidden suffering of the afflicted woman. Through this woman whom they could see, the witnesses were enabled to behold the divinity that cannot be seen. Through the Son’s own healing power his divinity became known. Through the afflicted women’s being healed her faith was made manifest. She caused him to be proclaimed, and indeed was honored with him. For truth was being proclaimed together with its heralds. If she was a witness to his divinity, he in turn was a witness to her faith… He saw through to her hidden faith, and gave her a visible healing.”
Jesus also gave supernatural hope to a father who had just lost a beloved child. It took considerable courage and risk for the ruler of a synagogue to openly go to Jesus and to invite the scorn of his neighbors and kin. Even the hired mourners laughed scornfully at Jesus. Their grief was devoid of any hope. Nonetheless, Jesus took the girl by the hand and delivered her from the grasp of death. Peter Chrysologus (400-450 AD), an early church father who was renowned for his preaching at Ravena, comments on this miracle:
“This man was a ruler of the synagogue, and versed in the law. He had surely read that while God created all other things by his word, man had been created by the hand of God. He trusted therefore in God that his daughter would be recreated, and restored to life by that same hand which, he knew, had created her… He [Jesus] who laid hands on her to form her from nothing, once more lays hands upon her to reform her from what had perished.”
In both instances we see Jesus’ personal concern for the needs of others and his readiness to heal and restore life. In Jesus we see the infinite love of God extending to each and every individual as he gives freely and wholly of himself to each person he meets. Do you approach the Lord with confident expectation that he will hear your request and act?
“Lord Jesus, you love each of us individually with a unique and personal love. Touch my life with your saving power, heal and restore me to fullness of life. Help me to give wholly of myself in loving service to others.”

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