Readings 20150120

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2015. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com

THEY DO RUN, RUN, RUN…

“Our desire is that each of you show the same zeal till the end.” —Hebrews 6:11
Life in Christ is like running a race (see 2 Tm 4:7; Phil 3:12; 1 Cor 9:24). We must “show the same zeal to the end” and “not grow lazy” (Heb 6:11, 12). We are able to keep running no matter what because we are loved by God and fully assured of inheriting God’s promises (Heb 6:11-12). Love keeps us running for God (see 2 Cor 5:14), and we love because God first loved us (1 Jn 4:19). He sent His Son to die for us, gave us a new nature, adopted us into His family, and made us His heirs.

“See what love the Father has bestowed on us in letting us be called children of God! Yet that is what we are” (1 Jn 3:1). The Lord “has bestowed on us the great and precious things He promised” (2 Pt 1:4), and He will continue to fulfill His promises perfectly. That’s what love is all about. Therefore, “do not grow lazy, but imitate those who, through faith and patience, are inheriting the promises” (Heb 6:12).

Beloved, run fast for God all the way across the finish line to “life on high in Christ Jesus” (Phil 3:14). Run, beloved, run!

Prayer: Father, You are faithful to Your promises. You are Love (1 Jn 4:16). I love You. Promise: “The Son of Man is Lord even of the Sabbath.” —Mk 2:28 Praise: Pope St. Fabian encouraged others to not give up on those lapsed from the Church but to encourage them and stand firm in the faith. (To spread God’s Word, be a Bible teacher. For encouragement, order our tapes on the Bible Teachers Series. Our six-tape audio series starts with AV 117-1. Our three-part video series starts with V-117.)
Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from December 1, 2014 through January 31, 2015.
†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, June 30, 2014.
The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2015, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net
What does the commandment “keep holy the Sabbath” require of us? Or better yet, what is the primary intention behind this command? The religious leaders confronted Jesus on this issue. The “Sabbath rest” was meant to be a time to remember and celebrate God’s goodness and the goodness of his work, both in creation and redemption. It was a day set apart for the praise of God, his work of creation, and his saving actions on our behalf. It was intended to bring everyday work to a halt and to provide needed rest and refreshment. Jesus’ disciples are scolded by the scribes and Pharisees, not for plucking and eating corn from the fields, but for doing so on the Sabbath. In defending his disciples, Jesus argues from the scriptures that human need has precedence over ritual custom.
When David and his men were fleeing for their lives, they sought food from Ahimelech the priest (1 Samuel 21:1-6). The only bread he had was the holy bread offered in the Temple. None but the priests were allowed to eat it. In their hunger, David and his men ate of this bread. Jesus reminds the Pharisees that the Sabbath was given for our benefit, to refresh and renew us in living for God. It was intended for good and not for evil. Withholding mercy and kindness in response to human need was not part of God’s intention that we rest from unnecessary labor. Do you honor the Lord in the way you treat your neighbor and celebrate the Lord’s Day?

“Lord Jesus, may I give you fitting honor in the way I live my life and in the way I treat my neighbor. May I honor the Lord’s Day as a day holy to you. And may I always treat others with the same mercy and kindness which you have shown to me. Free me from a critical and intolerant spirit that I may always seek the good of my neighbor.”

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