Readings 20141130

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2014. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com  

AN ADVENT AGEOUS ADVENT URE   “No ear has ever heard, no eye ever seen, any God but You doing such deeds for those who wait for Him.” —Isaiah 64:3  

We should take Advent as seriously as a new mother takes her pregnancy. The Christmas season is not merely a memory, celebration, or blessing, but a new, extremely important encounter with the incarnate Jesus. St. Charles Borromeo taught: “This holy season (Advent) teaches us that Christ’s coming was not only for the benefit of His contemporaries; His power has still to be communicated to us” (from Office of Readings, Monday of the first week of Advent). Christmas will be an exceptional grace or an opportunity sadly missed. Therefore, our Advent preparation for Christmas is very important for God’s kingdom, the Church, the world, the future, our families, and ourselves. “Our hearts should be as much prepared for this coming of Christ (Christmas) as if He were still to come into this world” (St. Charles Borromeo). Moreover, if we are not prepared for Christ’s unique Christmas coming this year, we are not prepared for His coming at the end of the world.

Consequently, “be constantly on the watch! Stay awake! You do not know when the appointed time will come” (Mk 13:33). “Wait for the revelation of our Lord Jesus Christ” (1 Cor 1:7). Make this the best Advent ever, preparing for Christ’s greatest Christmas coming of your life.  

Prayer: Father, make this Advent more than we can ever ask for or imagine (Eph 3:20). Promise: “Would that You might meet us doing right, that we were mindful of You in our ways!” —Is 64:4 Praise: Praise You, risen Jesus, Emmanuel, “God with us!” You became flesh and dwelt among us. Praise You for letting us see Your glory (Jn 1:14).     

Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from October 1, 2014 through November 30, 2014.†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, April 24, 2014.  The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2014, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net

What do you do when someone you love very dearly and miss very much has been gone a very long time but promises to return soon? Do you ignore their absence, or do you anticipate their return and send them messages to let them know how much you long to be with them again? Jesus’ parable about the long-expected return of the Master to his household brings this point home.

Parable of the watchful servants waiting for the master’s return Wealthy landowners often left their estates in the hands of their trustworthy servants and stewards. This gave them freedom to travel, trade, and expand their business ventures. They expected loyalty and hard work from their servants and rewarded them accordingly. Dutiful servants would eagerly anticipate their master’s return by keeping the house and estate in good order. Jesus doesn’t tell us in his parable whether the servants were ready to receive the unexpected return of their master. Were these servants excited or anxious about their master’s return? The watchful servants, no doubt, looked forward to the future because they knew their master would be pleased and would reward them for their vigilance and hard work. Disaster and reprisal, however, awaited those who were unprepared because of carelessness or laziness.

Watching with hopeful expectation and vigilance for Christ’s return When we expect some very important event to happen, we often wait for it with excited anticipation. The Lord Jesus expects us to watch in great anticipation for the most important event of all – his return in glory at the end of this present age! The Old Testament prophets foretold the coming of the Lord when he shall judge between the nations and decide for many peoples (Isaiah 2:5).

The Advent season reminds us that we are living in the end times. The end times begin with the first coming of Christ (when the Word of God became flesh and dwelt among us – John 1:14) and it culminates in Christ’s second coming on the Day of Judgment and vindication for his people. Jesus spoke of his return in glory at the close of the ages as an indisputable fact and predetermined act which he will perform as the Judge and Ruler of all peoples, nations, and individuals who ever lived on the earth.

“May your kingdom come!” While the second coming of Christ is for certain, the time of his appearance is not yet disclosed. The Lord’s day of visitation and judgment comes swiftly and unexpectedly. Jesus warns his listeners to not be caught off guard when that day arrives. It will surely come in God’s good time! The Lord invites us to pray for the coming of his kingdom into our present lives and future as well – “may your kingdom come and your will be done on earth as it is in heaven” (Matthew 6:10). Do you earnestly pray for the coming of God’s kingdom – both now and at the end of the world?  

The Lord will reward those who wait for him The prophet Isaiah tells us that God will surely reward those who wait for his visitation: “From of old no one has heard or perceived by the ear, no eye has seen a God besides you, who works for those who wait for him” (Isaiah 64:4). Our Lord and Master, Jesus Christ, has entrusted us with his gifts and graces (his abundant favors and blessings). He expects us to make good use of the gifts and resources he gives us for his glory and for the benefit of helping and blessing others as well. He does not want us to use the present time we have here on earth in idleness or wasted living. He has work for us to do – loving, honoring,and serving him and loving,honoring, and serving our families, neighbors, and communities as well.

How do we watch and wait for the Lord’s coming? How does the Lord want us to be watchful and vigilant for his return? The kind of watching the Lord has in mind is not a passive “wait and see what happens” approach to life. The Lord urges us to vigilance and to active prayer that his “kingdom may come” and his “will be done on earth as it is in heaven”. We are not only to watch for Christ, but to watch with Christ. The Lord wants us to have our hearts and minds fixed on him and his word. He wants us to be ready for his action and work of grace in our lives and in our world. Those who “wait” for the Lord will not be disappointed. He will surely come with his grace and saving help. Do you watch for the Lord’s action in your life with expectant faith and with joyful hope? The season of Advent is a time for rousing our minds and hearts for the Lord’s coming. As his servants we watch for his will – continually seeking him. We watch for his word and his power – that he may act now to save and to deliver. And we watch for his visitation – he will surely come again! Servants of the Lord rouse yourselves! Be vigilant, be alert, be “watchmen” for the Lord pointing the way for his coming.

“Lord Jesus, awaken my heart and mind to receive your word and to prepare for your coming again. Free me from complacency, from the grip of sin and worldliness, and from attachments to things which pass away. May I always be eager to receive your word and be ready to meet you when you came again.”

Saint of the day 20141130

30 November
SAINT ANDREWApostle(1st century)        
St. Andrew was one of the fishermen of Bethsaida, and brother, perhaps elder brother, of St. Peter, and became a disciple of St. John Baptist. He seemed always eager to bring others into notice; when called himself by Christ on the banks of the Jordan, his first thought was to go in search of his brother, and he said, “We have found the Messias,” and he brought him to Jesus. It was he again who, when Christ wished to feed the five thousand in the desert, pointed out the little lad with the five loaves and fishes.        

St. Andrew went forth upon his mission to plant the faith in Scythia and Greece, and at the end of years of toil to win a martyr’s crown. After suffering a cruel scourging at Patræ in Achaia, he was left, bound by cords, to die upon a cross. When St. Andrew first caught sight of the gibbet on which he was to die, he greeted the precious wood with joy. “O good cross! ” he cried, “made beautiful by the limbs of Christ, so long desired, now so happily found! Receive me into thy arms and present me to my Master, that He Who redeemed me through thee may now accept me from thee.”         Two whole days the martyr remained hanging on this cross alive, preaching, with outstretched arms from this chair of truth, to all who came near, and entreating them not to hinder his passion. Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]

In other years: St Andrew the ApostleHe was born in Bethsaida, in Galilee, and worked as a fisherman. He may have been a disciple of St John the Baptist. He became one of the first to follow Jesus and introduced his brother, Simon Peter, to him. As one of the twelve Apostles he was widely venerated in ancient times, and became patron saint of Scotland because according to legend some of his bones were brought there and buried at the place where the town of St Andrew’s now stands.

Other saints: St Cuthbert Mayne (1543-1577) Cuthbert Mayne was born at Yorkston, near Barnstaple, Devonshire 1543 and was executed at Launceston, Cornwall, 29 November, 1577. He was the son of William Mayne; he was educated at Barnstaple Grammar School and Oxford, where he got to know a number of men who were favourable to the Catholic cause, notably Edmund Campion and Gregory Martin, who themselves went over to Douai. He was persuaded of the truth of the Catholic cause but held back initially for fear of losing his appointments and his income. Late in 1570 a letter from Gregory Martin to Cuthbert fell into the Bishop of London’s hands. He at once arranged for Cuthbert and others mentioned in the letter to be arrested. Being warned, Cuthbert managed to escape and got to Douai. There he was received into the Catholic Church, and was ordained priest in 1575. He soon left for the English mission. He went to live with Francis Tregian, of Golden Manor, in St Probus’s parish, Cornwall, who was subsequently imprisoned for harbouring him. Cuthbert was arrested in June, 1577, taken to Launceston and put on trial in September. He was found guilty of high treason, and was sentenced accordingly. The trial attracted considerable attention partly because he was the first so-called ‘seminary priest’ to be tried; a legal distinction was made between ‘Marian’ priests who had been ordained in England, and ‘seminary’ priests who had studied and had been ordained overseas. His execution was delayed because one of the judges altered his mind after sentence and sent a report to the Privy Council. They submitted the case to the whole Bench of Judges, which was inclined to Jeffries’s view. Nevertheless, for motives of policy, the Council ordered the conviction to stand “as a terror to the papists” and a warning to priests coming from abroad. A rough portrait of the martyr still exists.

Readings 20141129

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2014, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net

Is there anything holding you back from the joy and freedom of the Lord? God wants our hearts for him and for his kingdom of peace, joy, and righteousness (Romans 14:17). But our hearts can be weighed down by many different things, such as greed, gluttony, drunkenness, and so many other harmful addictions and sinful habits. Jesus, our Lord and Master, offers us true freedom – freedom from the power of sin and wasted life, and freedom from our unruly desires and disordered passions – such as making food, drink or anything else our master rather than our servant. Jesus wants our hearts to be ruled by one thing only – his love and truth which enables us to choose whatever is good and to reject whatever is evil and harmful for us.

Jesus also warns us of the temptation to slacken off – to become spiritually idle, lazy, indifferent, or inattentive to God’s word and guidance for our lives. We can fall asleep spiritually if we allow other things to distract us from the reality of God and his kingdom. It is very easy to get caught up in the things of the present moment or to be weighed down with anxious cares and concerns.

The Lord knows our struggles, weaknesses, and shortcomings. And he assures us that we do not need to carry our burdens alone nor struggle without his help. He is always very present and ready to give us whatever strength, guidance, and help we need to fight temptation and to stay the course which he has set for us. But there is one thing he doesn’t tolerate: indifference, an attitude of not caring, and doing nothing! The Lord wants us to cast our anxieties on him and to ask for his guidance and help. Do you pray for God’s strength and wisdom?

Until the Lord comes again we can expect troubles, trials, and temptations. Our adversary the devil does not rest in his attempt to lure us away from God’s will for our lives. If he cannot succeed in getting us to renounce our faith in Christ, he will try, little by little, to distract us from pursuing God, especially in prayer and listening to his word. Ask the Lord Jesus to rekindle the fire of his love in you so that you will be ready and eager to meet him when he comes again.

“Lord Jesus, rouse my spirit to the truth that this world is passing away. Give me a lively faith, a joyful hope, and a fervent love to see you face to face when you return in glory.”

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2014. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com  

NO DEAD END  

“The throne of God and of the Lamb shall be there, and His servants shall serve Him faithfully. They shall see Him face to face.” —Revelation 22:3-4   On this last day of the Church’s year, in this new millennium, Jesus says, as quoted in the last verses of the Bible: “Remember, I am coming soon!” (Rv 22:7) After Jesus’ final coming, those who have been faithful slaves of Jesus will go to heaven and see the Lord face to face (Rv 22:4). “Never again shall they know hunger or thirst, nor shall the sun or its heat beat down on them, for the Lamb on the throne will shepherd them. He will lead them to springs of life-giving water, and God will wipe every tear from their eyes” (Rv 7:16-17). “The night shall be no more. They will need no light from lamps or the sun, for the Lord God shall give them light, and they shall reign forever” (Rv 22:5).

“These words are trustworthy and true” (Rv 22:6). “So be on the watch. Pray constantly for the strength to escape whatever is in prospect, and to stand secure before the Son of Man” (Lk 21:36). “Maranatha!” Come, Lord Jesus!  

Prayer: Father, may I go to be with You in heaven forever. May I take with me as many people as possible. Promise: “Happy the man who heeds the prophetic message of this book!” —Rv 22:7 Praise: After her car was totalled, Anne was more aware of the closeness of Jesus.   (For a related teaching, order our leaflet Evangelism and Worship or our tape on audio AV 49-1 or video V-49.)   

Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from October 1, 2014 through November 30, 2014.†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, April 24, 2014.  The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements

Saint of the day 20141129

29 November
SAINT SATURNINUS Bishop and Martyr († 250)        

Saturninus went from Rome, by direction of Pope Fabian, about the year 245, to preach the faith in Gaul. He fixed his episcopal see at Toulouse, and thus became the first Christian bishop of that city. There were but few Christians in the place. However, their number grew fast after the coming of the Saint; and his power was felt by the spirits of evil, who received the worship of the heathen. His power was felt the more because he had to pass daily through the capitol, the high place of the heathen worship, on the way to his own church.        

One day a great multitude was gathered by an altar, where a bull stood ready for the sacrifice. A man in the crowd pointed out Saturninus, who was passing by, and the people would have forced him to idolatry; but the holy bishop answered: “I know but one God, and to Him I will offer the sacrifice of praise. How can I fear gods who, as you say, are afraid of me?” On this he was fastened to the bull, which was driven down the capitol. The brains of the Saint were scattered on the steps. His mangled body was taken up and buried by two devout women. Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894] Saturday memorials of the Blessed Virgin MaryOn Saturdays in Ordinary Time when there is no obligatory memorial, an optional memorial of the Blessed Virgin Mary is allowed.   

The memorial is a remembrance of the maternal example and discipleship of the Blessed Virgin Mary who, strengthened by faith and hope, on that great Saturday on which Our Lord lay in the tomb, was the only one of the disciples to hold vigil in expectation of the Lord’s resurrection; it is a prelude and introduction to the celebration of Sunday, the weekly memorial of the Resurrection of Christ; and it is a sign that the “Virgin Mary is continuously present and operative in the life of the Church”.

Readings 20141128

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2014. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com  

PASSED AWAY  

“My words will not pass.” —Luke 21:33   To describe death, we say: “He passed away.” “The heavens and earth will pass away” (Lk 21:33; Rv 21:1). “Created things will pass away” (Heb 12:27). “The world with its seductions is passing away” (1 Jn 2:17). “The world as we know it is passing away” (1 Cor 7:31). Almost everything is passing away.

All this passing away is a terrible problem for all human beings, for the Lord “has put the timeless” into our heart (Eccl 3:11). Our heart for the timeless is threatened and disturbed by all this passing away.

This interior conflict is resolved by the few things that don’t pass away. God doesn’t pass away, and His Word and kingdom don’t pass away (Heb 12:28). Even we don’t pass away. Although our bodies temporarily pass away, they will be raised up on the last day, and our spirits at death go to heaven, purgatory, or hell. So they don’t experience even a temporary passing. Whenever you hear the term “passed away,” smile inside, for God, His Word, His kingdom, and you will never pass away. Alleluia! Praise Jesus, the Resurrection and the Life! (Jn 11:25)  

Prayer: Jesus, thank You for everlasting life. Promise: “Then I saw new heavens and a new earth.” —Rv 21:1 Praise: Though her friends and family have died, Sarah looks forward to each day — and the last day.   (To be holier, learn more about the Bible. You may wish to order our Overview of the Bible, a small series which has six audio tapes starting with AV 10A-1 or a three video tape series starting with V-10A.)   

Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from October 1, 2014 through November 30, 2014.†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, April 24, 2014.  The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2014, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net

Do you recognize the signs of God’s presence and action among us today? Jesus used the image of a fig tree to teach his disciples an important lesson about reading the “signs of the times.” The fig tree was a common and important source of food for the Jews. It bore fruit twice a year, in the autumn and in the early spring. The Talmud said that the first fruit came the day after Passover. The Jews believed that when the Messiah came he would usher in the kingdom of God at Passover time.

The early signs of a changing season, such as springtime, summer, or autumn, are evident for all who can see and observe the changes. Just so are the signs of God’s kingdom and his return in glory on the day of judgment. The “budding” of God’s kingdom begins first in the hearts of those who are receptive to God’s word. Those who trust in God’s word will bear the fruits of his kingdom. And what are the fruits of that kingdom? “The kingdom of God ..is righteousness and peace and joy in the Holy Spirit” (Romans 14:17). The Lord gives the first-fruits of his kingdom to those who open their hearts to him with expectant faith and trust in his word.

We do not know the day nor the hour when the Lord Jesus will return again in glory. But the Lord does give us signs, not only to “wake us up” as a warning, but also to “rouse our spirits” to be ready and eager to receive his kingdom when he comes in all his power and glory. The “Day of the Lord” will strike terror in those who have ignored or rejected God, but it will be a day of joy and rejoicing for those who long to see the Lord face-to-face. The Lord Jesus wants us to be filled with joyful anticipation for his coming again.

While we wait for the Lord’s physical return in glory, we can know his presence with us through the work and action of the Holy Spirit who dwells in our hearts. The Lord Jesus comes daily and frequently to those who long for him and he speaks tenderly to our hearts like a lover who whispers in the ear of the beloved. He comes to show us the way to our heavenly Father and to give us the hope of eternal life. Do you recognize his presence and do you listen to his word?

“Lord Jesus Christ, you are the Alpha and the Omega, the beginning and the end of all history, and the lord of all creation. Give me joyful hope and assurance that I will see you face to face and be united with you forever when you return in glory.”

Saint of the day 20141128

28 November

SAINT JAMES OF THE MARCHES OF ANCONAFranciscan Priest (1394-1476)         The small town of Montbrandon, in the Marches of Ancona, gave birth to this Saint. When young he was sent to the University of Perugia, where his progress in learning soon qualified him to be chosen preceptor to a young gentleman of Florence. Fearing that he might be ingulfed in the whirlpool of world excesses, St. James applied himself to prayer and recollection.         When travelling near Assisium he went into the great Church of the Portiuncula to pray, and being animated by the fervor of the holy men who there served God, and by the example of their blessed founder St. Francis, he determined to petition in that very place for the habit of the Order. He began his spiritual war against the devil, the world, and the flesh, with assiduous prayer and extraordinary fasts and watchings. For forty years he never passed a day without taking the discipline.         Being chosen Archbishop of Milan, he fled, and could not be prevailed on to accept the office. He wrought several miracles at Venice and at other places, and raised from dangerous sicknesses the Duke of Calabria and the King of Naples.        
The Saint died in the convent of the Holy Trinity of his Order, near Naples, on the 28th of November, in the year 1476, being ninety years old, seventy of which he had spent in a religious state. Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]

Readings 20141127

The following reflection is courtesy of Don Schwager (c) 2014, whose website is located at DailyScripture.net

Do you believe that the world as we know it is going to end just as Jesus foretold? Jesus’ prophetic description of the destruction of the holy city Jerusalem, the destruction of the world, and the day of final judgment, was not new to the people of Israel. The prophets had foretold these events many centuries before. Behold the day of the Lord comes, cruel, with wrath and fierce anger to make the earth a desolation and to destroy its sinners from it (Isaiah 13:9-13; see also  Joel 2:1-2; Amos 5:18-20; Zephaniah 1:14-18) .

Jesus warns of the imminent destruction of Jerusalem as a consequence of the rejection of the Gospel. According the historian Josephus, over a million inhabitants died when the Romans destroyed Jerusalem with its temple in 70 A.D. Jerusalem’s vengeance resulted from her indifference to the visitation of God in the person of the Lord Jesus Christ (Luke 19:44).

Jesus also speaks about the judgment at the end of the world. Only spiritual blindness can keep us from recognizing the obvious signs of approaching disaster which awaits the day of judgment for those who refuse to heed God’s word of grace and salvation. Jesus was completely honest. He told his disciples what it would cost to follow him. And he promised that he would never leave them alone, even in their time of tribulation. The saints and martyrs who underwent torment and death made their prisons a temple of praise and their scaffolds a throne to the glory of God. They knew the saving presence of Jesus Christ with them in all circumstances. Jesus offers us safety in the face of earth’s threats. Not a hair of your head will perish (Luke 21:18). The disciple who walks with Christ may lose their body but not their soul.

The greatest gift which no one can take from us and which we can be most thankful for is our redemption through the precious blood of Jesus, which was shed on the cross for our sins, and our adoption through Christ as children of God our heavenly Father. Jesus Christ has redeemed us from slavery to sin, from fear of death, and from final destruction. We can be eternally thankful because our hope is anchored in heaven and in the promise that Jesus will return to fully establish his reign of peace and righteousness.

Jesus speaks of his second coming as a known fact, a for certain event which we can confidently expect to take place in the Lord’s time of choosing. This coming will be marked by signs that all will recognize – signs which will strike terror and grief in those who are unprepared and wonder and joy in those who are ready to meet the Lord. When the Lord Jesus returns he will fully establish his kingdom of justice and righteousness and he will vindicate all who have been faithful to him. His judgment is a sign of hope for those who have placed their trust in him. Do you hope in God and in the promise of Christ to return again to establish his reign of righteousness and peace?

“Lord Jesus, fill me with gratitude for the gift of redemption and increase my hope and longing for your return again in glory. May that day bring joy to my heart rather than sorrow. Help me to serve you faithfully and to make the best use of my time now in the light of your coming again.”

The following reflection is courtesy of PresentationMinistries.com (c) 2014. Their website is located at PresentationMinistries.com  

THE FEAST OF FEASTS  

“The angel then said to me: ‘Write this down: Happy are they who have been invited to the wedding feast of the Lamb.’ ” —Revelation 19:9   In the USA, today is Thanksgiving Day. Many of us will be enjoying the traditional Thanksgiving feast with our families. We hope that this feast will prefigure the ultimate feast, “the wedding feast of the Lamb” in heaven.

To accept the Lord’s invitation to His wedding feast, we must make a covenant of love with Him, completely give our lives to the Lord, and have a relationship with Him which transcends marriage. This wedding feast is the feast of Jesus, called the Lamb. To come to the wedding feast, we need the weakness of the slain Lamb of God. We must have the weakness of the cross (see 2 Cor 13:4) by which God’s power is brought to perfection (2 Cor 12:9). Furthermore, all those at the heavenly wedding feast “have survived the great period of trial; they have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb” (Rv 7:14). At the everlasting, ultimate wedding feast, all present have a purified, crucified, covenant-love for the Lamb of God. At Holy Communion, the priest proclaims: “Behold the Lamb of God, behold Him Who takes away the sins of the world. Blessed are those called to the supper of the Lamb.” Live a life of love and daily Communion. Accept the invitation to the heavenly wedding feast of the Lamb.  

Prayer: Father, thank You for inviting me to celebrate with You forever in heaven. I accept Your invitation. Promise: “When these things begin to happen, stand erect and hold your heads high, for your deliverance is near at hand.” —Lk 21:28 Praise: Clara’s home-based community gets together several times monthly for fellowship, thanksgiving, and faith-building.     

Rescript: In accord with the Code of Canon Law, I hereby grant my permission to publish One Bread, One Body covering the period from October 1, 2014 through November 30, 2014.†Most Reverend Joseph R. Binzer, Auxiliary Bishop, Vicar General of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, April 24, 2014.  The rescript is a declaration that a book or pamphlet is considered to be free of doctrinal or moral error. It is not implied that those who have granted ecclesial permission agree with the contents, opinions, or statements